Without Book Interview Questions and Answers | Online Test | Moct Test
Download Android App in your Android Device from Google Play Store
- Search for "Withoutbook Practice Exam Test" in Mobile/Tablet Play Store
Institute Training Search by Name or Email

Exams Attended

Make Homepage

Bookmark this page

Subscribe Email Address

Core Java Interview Questions and Answers

Ques. Difference between Vector and ArrayList in Java
Ans. 1) Vector and ArrayList are index based and backed up by an array internally.
2) Both ArrayList and Vector maintains the insertion order of element. Means you can assume that you will get the object in the order you have inserted if you iterate over ArrayList or Vector.
3) Both iterator and ListIterator returned by ArrayList and Vector are fail-fast.

Key Differences between Vector and ArrayList in Java
1) First and foremost difference is Vector is synchronized and ArrayList is not, what it means is that all the method which structurally modifies Vector e.g. add () or remove () are synchronized which makes it thread-safe and allows it to be used safely in a multi-threaded environment. On the other hand ArrayList methods are not synchronized thus not suitable for use in multi-threaded environment.

2) ArrayList is faster than Vector. Since Vector is synchronized it pays price of synchronization which makes it little slow. On the other hand ArrayList is not synchronized and fast which makes it obvious choice in a single-threaded access environment. You can also use ArrayList in a multi-threaded environment if multiple threads are only reading values from ArrayList.

3) Whenever Vector crossed the threshold specified it increases itself by value specified in capacityIncrement field while you can increase size of arrayList by calling ensureCapacity () method.

4) Vector can return enumeration of items it hold by calling elements () method which is not fail-fast as opposed to iterator and ListIterator returned by ArrayList.

5) Another point worth to remember is Vector is one of those classes which comes with JDK 1.0 and initially not part of Collection framework but in later version it's been re-factored to implement List interface so that it could become part of collection framework



Conclusion is use ArrayList wherever possible and avoids use of Vector until you have no choice.
Is it helpful? Yes No

Most helpful rated by users:

©2016 WithoutBook